Deputyships 2017-05-19T16:12:58+00:00

YOU NEED A DEPUTYSHIP IF 

 

– You care for someone who doesn’t have mental capacity

– You manage their finance and well-being

– They don’t have a Lasting Power of Attorney (LPA)

 

 

 

 

 

 

The process of applying for a Deputyship is far more stringent than the Power of Attorney

This is because the Court is granting you power over someone’s life without their consent

The court will be thorough in their assessment, ensuring  the application is in the person’s best interests and that you are the best person for the job.

You will not be successful in obtaining a Deputyship if your cared for person has mental capacity – instead they should get an LPA

Carers lasting power of attorney

There are two types of Deputyship’s

One Deputyship Order looks after property and finances, the other Health and well-being.

Health & wellbeing

Health & Well-being Deputyships

Unlike an LPA, the Court are really loathed to create Health and Well-being Deputyship orders.

However, if you regularly provide support during hospital visits, doctors and dentist appointments then perhaps you should ask whether you need one.

Talk to us about a Deputyship

 

Why set up a Deputyship

For someone who has minimal income and assets then you probably don’t need to.

However, anyone who no longer has mental capacity, no Lasting Power of Attorney but does have property or other assets will probably need one.

Talk to us about a Deputyship

 

Brain Damage

Something to consider #1

If your cared for person develops dementia or has a stroke and they don’t have an LPA you will need a Deputyship to manage their property, income or sell assets to cover care home charges.

Talk to us about a Deputyship

 

Brain Injury

Something to consider #2

If your cared for person suffered a serious brain injury you will not be able to administer any compensation or court settlement to pay for their ongoing care regime, or make decisions about medical treatment without a Deputyship.

Talk to us about a Deputyship

 

Something to consider #3

If a person without capacity is left money as a gift or in a trust they can’t give a receipt so can’t have the money unless you have a Deputyship and can do this on their behalf.

Talk to us about a Deputyship